Ghosts Paranormal

The Ghost of Ann Walker: England’s Creepiest Paranormal Legend

theghostdiaries
2 years, 11 months ago
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The ghost of Anne Walker is one of the great paranormal legends from Britain. The event allegedly occurred over the course of a few days or weeks in 1681 when, according to James Graeme of County Durham, England, a woman drenched in blood and covered in open wounds, appeared and relayed to him the story of her murder. Ann, who was said to have been pregnant when she disappeared, had been missing for weeks.

The apparition claimed that Ann Walker was brutally murdered with a pickax by a man named Mark Sharp.

Perhaps dazed by his paranormal encounter, James Graeme did not act upon this information.

And so the ghost of Ann Walker returned. This time the ghost said that Sharp, her murderer, had been instructed to kill her by a relative, Mr. Walker, who had supposedly impregnated Ann. Again, Graeme did not act. And so the ghost returned for a third time, this time with a warning that she would not stop haunting him until he went to the local magistrate and reported the killing.

Little is known about the mental stability of Mr. Graeme, but what is known is that he accurately led investigators to the body of Ann Walker, whose corpse contained multiple pickax wounds. Also found at the crime scene was Sharp’s bloody shoe and stocking, which evidently was enough to convict both he and Walker. Protesting their innocence until the very end, Sharp and Walker were executed for the murder of Ann Walker. After their deaths, the ghost of Ann Walker went silent.

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Did James Graeme really get information about the murder from Anne Walker’s ghost? If not, how did he know where her body was? Is it possible that Graeme himself was the murderer and concocted the ghost story, as well as some evidence tampering, in order to pin the crime on two innocent men?

It is extremely unlikely we will ever know the truth of this case, as enough time has passed that evidence and official court records are virtually nonexistent. However, it is worth noting that at one point during the trial, both the judge, recorded only as Judge Davenport, and the jury foreman, reported seeing an apparitional child–perhaps Walker’s unborn son–clinging to his shoulders during the trial.

Main source: Reader’s Digest, eds., Folklore, Myths and Legends of Britain

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