Real Vampire hunter kits

Real Vampire Hunter Kits From The 1800s

Entertainment, Vampires
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One of the most intriguing mysteries of the 19th century involves the manufacturing and selling of vampire killing kits. Several vampire hunter kits have turned up in recent years, and some have sold for exorbitant amounts of money. The true origin of these vampire kits is shrouded in mystery.

Although it can’t be 100 percent proven, there seems to be historical evidence that vampire hunting kits became popular in western Europe after the release of Bram Stoker’s Dracula in 1897. Superstitious travelers would supposedly purchase these vampire killer kits in preparation for their perilous travels to Eastern Europe.

More likely intended as souvenirs for rich novelty collectors, these kits would typically include garlic, a bible, stakes, crosses, silver bullets, and glass vials that held various concoctions to ward off vampires. Interestingly, a few vampire hunter kits have shown up with artifacts that predate Bram Stoker’s Dracula and other written accounts of vampires, pointing to the strong oral history component of the vampire legacy.



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  • dezera ferrin

    i would like to find a vampire hunter club so please help me

    • The Ghost Diaries

      Haven’t heard of any recently but I bet you there’s one in Santa Cruz with all tha damn vampires there!

  • JohnH

    “One of the most intriguing mysteries of the 18th century…”

    This article fails before the first sentence is finished. Which century?

    • Jared Salas

      Why does it fail?

      • The Ghost Diaries
        • JohnH

          The article has been changed to “19th century”. Can you not read the quote of the original first sentence in my comment?

      • JohnH

        Because the 1800s are the 19th century, not the “18th century” which is what the article originally said.

    • The Ghost Diaries

      The 1800s are the 19th century. Statement–at least timeframe–is correct.

      • JohnH

        Since I wrote this the sentence has been changed to “19th century”.